Transplant

CMV

About Cytomegalovirus  is a common virus for people of all ages; however, a healthy person’s immune system usually keeps the virus from causing illness. People with weakened immune systems who get CMV can have more serious symptoms affecting the eyes, lungs, liver, esophagus, stomach, and intestines.

People with CMV may pass the virus in body fluids, such as saliva, urine, blood, tears, semen, and breast milk. Healthy people who are infected with CMV usually do not require medical treatment.

 

EBV

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), also known as human herpesvirus 4, is a member of the herpes virus family. It is one of the most common human viruses. EBV is found all over the world. Most people get infected with EBV at some point in their lives. EBV spreads most commonly through bodily fluids, primarily saliva.

There is no vaccine to protect against EBV infection. You can help protect yourself by not kissing or sharing drinks, food, or personal items, like toothbrushes, with people who have EBV infection.

BKV

Nephropathy from BK virus (BKV) infection is an evolving challenge in kidney transplant recipients. It is the consequence of modern potent immunosuppression aimed at reducing acute rejection and improving allograft survival.

Untreated BKV infections lead to kidney allograft dysfunction or loss. Decreased immunosuppression is the principle treatment but predisposes to acute and chronic rejection. Screening protocols for early detection and prevention of symptomatic BKV nephropathy have improved outcomes.